Does Hegel really reject the Law of Non-Contradiction or is that just something

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Does Hegel really reject the Law of Non-Contradiction or is that just something analytic philosophers like to say because they dislike him so much?

I don't know anything about Hegel, but I have several friends who reject the Law of Non-contradiction, and they're all perfectly respectable analytic philosophers, with lots of friends who are also analytic philosophers. So I doubt that the claim that Hegel rejects the Law of Non-contradiction, in so far as it is made by analytic philosophers, is one they make because they don't like Hegel. Most of them don't know any more about Hegel than I do, I'll wager.

Personally, I'm a big fan of the Law of Non-contradiction, and I think there are good reasons not to reject it. But doing so, as I've indicated, isn't completely nuts. If you want to know about this approach to logic, read the article on dialetheism at the Stanford Encyclopedia.

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