It is common to characterize emotions as unhelpful in moral discernment. When

Read another response by Michael Cholbi
Read another response about Emotion, Ethics
It is common to characterize emotions as unhelpful in moral discernment. When faced with a situation that requires careful moral deliberation, emotion is often set aside, while reason and evidence are taken to be very important. Isn't always this the case? Do emotions really have no value in moral discernment, or they have to some extent but some philosophers have just neglected their part?