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Why is it that adults preach about democracy and how great it is when really if

Why is it that adults preach about democracy and how great it is when really if you're under 18 your parents are like dictators?

This might be taking your question too narrowly, but how about this: democracy is a form of government that places political power in the hands of citizens through their right to vote. But not all citizens are given a vote: five-year olds aren't, the mentally deranged aren't. In particular, if you haven't reached what used to be called "the age of reason", you are denied a vote. So, if your parents are all gung-ho for democracy, but insist on grounding your 15-year-old self on a Saturday night, well, that might be really irritating, but it's not inconsistent.

Parental rights over children usually lapse at the same time that their child acquires the right to vote. Coincidence? No. Parents have a right and a duty to make decisions for their children until they have reached a level of maturity and intelligence at which they can be held responsible for their decisions — and once a person has reached that level, democracies should extend him/her the vote.

In what category, now that 'politics' seems to have been removed from the site

In what category, now that 'politics' seems to have been removed from the site would I best find questions and answers relating to the quite large field of political philosophy?

Justice. (The word "politics" was generating too many questions about, well, politics.)

POKER - the card game, not Wittgenstein's - seems to have taken many by storm,

POKER - the card game, not Wittgenstein's - seems to have taken many by storm, especially college students. Its ethical (not to mention legal) status, however, eludes us. Is it unethical to play poker? If your answer to this question relies on conceiving of poker as "gambling", then would poker tournaments, in which an entry fee is paid and one cannot lose more than that entry fee (your chips no longer represent real money), deserve the same appraisal? Is gambling unethical, and is there any such thing as something being inherently addictive, or do different people just get addicted to different things because of who they are? Here's a preliminary thought: Our socio/economic system is rather unjust, with many poor people and a few very rich ones. At the poker table, however, a just meritocracy exists: those with intelligence win and climb up the economic ladder. Win one poker tournament for $5, and you now have the entry fee for 5 more such tournaments. For intelligent people currently working...

The society of poker players displays a kind of procedural fairness--if everyone starts with the same amount then there is no one to blame for future discrepancies other than Lady Luck and the players' own decisions. But is this type of procedural fairness all that is required in a just society? Many would argue that a just society, or more broadly a good society is one that takes care of those below a certain level of well-being no matter how they got there. In many cases it's just bad luck when a person's life is turned upside-down by natural disaster, but I don't think we would consider a society good if it therefore did absolutely nothing about this suffering.

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