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Is it appropriate to email a philosopher in Academia about a journal article

Is it appropriate to email a philosopher in Academia about a journal article they may have published, whether it be with a possible criticism or query? This is assuming that the emailer is just a casual reader of said journal, not an academic, with no involvement in a university. Also assuming the email is polite, to the point, not of an exorbitant length, and the emailer is quite sure of his query or criticism.

Ditto. It's nice to know that something one has written has actually been read by someone who cared enough to respond, even if critically ... !

ap

Ditto. It's nice to know that something one has written has actually been read by someone who cared enough to respond, even if critically ... ! ap

I am a student thinking about career choice. My parents say that I should focus

I am a student thinking about career choice. My parents say that I should focus on getting a job that will make a lot of money but without too many hours. But other people have told me that doing something I really believe in is good and having pleasant co-workers are equally as important. My priest says I should do work that I believe glorifies God, but I don't really understand how that translates into a concrete job choice. What answers does philosophy offer for thinking about what kind of job is worthwhile to pursue?

We think philosophy can help in finding one's identity and values, as ap points out. We also think that you have identified a number of different values (money, satisfaction, good co-workers...). Some values are essential (you need enough money for food). We suggest identifying your fundamental values, and trying rank or bundle them to get the best overall combination of values available to you.

Good wishes from CT and TJH, a soon to be graduate who is wrestling with a similar question!

Thanks for your question, and a good one it is. One quick answer is that doing philosophy helps you clarify, to yourself, your own thoughts, feelings, opinions, and values. Obviously one needs to earn a living; but just how much, and what kind of living, may be pretty flexible. Presumably, you'd want to pursue a career that enriches you, develops you, and yet does so in a way harmonious with (and perhaps furthering) who you fundamentally are (your beliefs, opinions, values, etc.). That you're consulting with a priest suggests that religious concerns are important to you .... and one (presumably) consults with a priest hoping that the advice given will help one develop one's religious side and pursue the choices that best fit one's religious self. Well, so too consulting with philosophy -- doing philosophy, reading it, thinking about it, etc. -- can help you not only develop yourself but ALSO pursue the choices that best fit who you are ... (You may even want to subject your religious elements to...